Archive for September, 2012

September 29th, 2012

Products made in USA.

A friend of mine shared this in an email. I thought I would pass it on to my readers. We Americans need to start searching for products made here in the US. Enjoy

Costcosells Goodyear wiper blades for almost half the price that you will pay on the outside and they are made in the U.S.A.

Unfortunately our politicians and top CEO’s have pushed for trade to china and Mexico for years so Americans are now out of work. Did you know that there is no electric coffee maker made in the US and that the only kitchen appliances made in the US is Viking? This information came from a report made byDiane Sawyer.

I DIDN’T KNOW HALLMARK CARDS WERE MADE IN CHINA ! That is also why I don’t buy cards at Hallmark any more. I buy cards at Dollar Tree – 50 cents each and made in USA

I have been looking at blenders available on the Internet. Kitchen Aid is MADE IN the US. Top of my list already

Yesterday I was in Walmart looking for a wastebasket. I found some made in China for $6.99. I didn’t want to pay that much so I asked the lady if they had any others. She took me to another department and they had some at $2.50 made in USA . They are just as good. Same for the kitchen rug I needed. I had to look, but I found some made in the USA – what a concept! – And they were $3.00 cheaper.

We are being brainwashed to believe that everything that comes from China and Mexico is cheaper. Not so.

I was in Lowe’s the other day and just out of curiosity, I looked at the garden hose attachments. They were all made in China . The next day I was in Ace Hardware and just for the heck of it I checked the hose attachments there. They were made in USA .

Start looking, people . . …In our current economic situation, every little thing we buy or do affects someone else – most often, their job.

My grandson likes Hershey’s candy. I noticed, though, that it is now marked “made in Mexico .” I don’t buy it anymore.

My favorite toothpaste Colgate is made in Mexico …now I have switched to Crest.

You have to read the labels on everything.

This past weekend I was at Kroger . . . I needed 60W light bulbs and Bounce dryer sheets
Right next to the GE brand bulbs I normally buy — was a brand labeled, “Everyday Value.” I picked up both types of bulbs and compared them: they were the same except for the price . . .The GE bulbs cost more than the Everyday Value brand, but the thing that surprised me the most was that that GE was made in MEXICO and the Everyday Value brand was made in – you guessed it – the USA at a company in Cleveland, Ohio.

It’s Way past time to start finding and buying products you use every day that are made right here in the good old US of A!.

So, on to the next aisle: Bounce Dryer Sheets… yep, you guessed it, Bounce cost more money and is made in Canada . The Everyday Value brand cost less, and was MADE IN THE USA! I did laundry yesterday and the dryer sheets performed just like the Bounce Free I have been using for years, at almost half the price.

My challenge to you is to start reading the labels when you shop for everyday things and see what you can find that is made in the USA – the job you save may be your ownor your neighbor’s!

If you accept the challenge, pass this on to others in your address book so we can all start buying American, one light bulb at a time!

Stop buying from overseas companies – you’re sending the jobs there. (We should have awakened a decade ago….)

Let’s get with the program and help our fellow Americans keep their jobs and create more jobs here in the USA .
Support the products that are ” Made in the USA ”
THIS SHOULD HAVE BEEN STARTED OVER 10 YEARS BACK.

September 25th, 2012

Where The Hell Is Matt

Where the Hell Is Matt Love this. Watch this, it will make your heart dance with JOY!!!

September 25th, 2012

20 Things You Can Use Twice Before Tossing

The family and I were celebrating my birthday on Monte Sano state park. There was a group up there. A face make-up artist was putting a werewolf together. He is trying to get on Teen Were on t.v.. This was right up my alley. I love this type of thing.

I thought these were very clever tips. If you have others, please leave in comment to ad to this list. Thanks Tipnut.com. I am glad I found you so I can share some of your articles on my blog.

Here’s a previously published list of ideas that has collected lots of tips from readers over time, did we miss any? Please add yours!
Dry Cleaning Bags: Use to pack suits, dresses and fine clothing when traveling, this will help protect it from wrinkles when packing. When storing the bags make sure to keep them safely out of reach of children, they really are that dangerous.
Butter Wrappers: Once you’ve removed a block of butter from its wrapping, place the wrapping in a plastic container or bag and refrigerate. Use it to grease baking pans.

Business Cards: Use the other side to label storage boxes and tubs and tape to the outside of the lid or side so you can see at a glance what the container is holding.

Used Envelopes: Cut a corner off envelopes and use as bookmark corner sleeves–just slide one over the page you are at and you’ll find your place easily the next time you pick up the book. No more folded corners and nice way to utilize used envelopes! You can also use envelopes for To Do lists, store garden seeds, and as bookmarks and labels.
Cardboard Egg Cartons: You can use these to make homemade firestarters.

Tissue Boxes: Once they’re empty you can use these as a plastic bag dispenser, just fill with grocery bags and you’ll be able to neatly pull out one at a time.
Plastic Grocery Bags: Use as garbage pail liners, paint tray covers, packing material.
Plastic Bread Clips: Save a few of the square plastic clips that keep bread bags closed to use as tiny scrapers. They come in handy to remove labels, price tags, and even do a good job scratching lottery tickets.

Newspaper: Line kitty litter boxes for easy cleanup (top with kitty litter), protect work surfaces from crafts & interior paint jobs, giftwrap, use as packing material when moving or shipping.
Plastic Strawberry Baskets: Use as a homemade bubble machine, hold small packets in the pantry.
Cleaner Spray Bottles: Clean thoroughly and use to hold your homemade cleaners, use to spray plants…very important to clean thoroughly first.

Mesh From Veggie Bags: If you buy veggies that are bagged in nylon mesh, you can use that mesh for various cleaning jobs around the house and yard. Just wad up the bag and use it as a scrubber.

Styrofoam Food Trays: Clean thoroughly, wrap in foil then use as trays for giving gifts of baking.
Pantyhose: Use in the garden to tie plants to stakes, make shower spa bags plus there are 20 ideas found here.
Paper Towel Cardboard Rolls: Use to wrap extension cords, Christmas lights (keep untangled).

Citrus Peels: Use to make your own homemade citrus cleaners, candy peels to use in baking or freeze the peels to use for zest in recipes as needed, Save your peels from citrus fruits like lemons and oranges. You can toss them in the fire place when you have a fire going to give the room a nice, fresh smell.

Packing Foam Peanuts: Save them and reuse when packing breakables, storing Christmas decorations or sending gifts in the mail

Brown Paper Bags: Once used, twist into small rolls and use as fire starters.
Laundry Bottle Caps & Scoops: Wash thoroughly and use as sandbox, pool, bathtub toys or pet food scoopers (for dried food).

Cereal Liner Bags: Clean and use for stacking meat patties before freezing, store bread crusts, cover food in the microwave.

September 23rd, 2012

Old Wives’ Tales For Homemakers

This is a fun article about old wives tales. I thought you might enjoy this.
Pama

This collection is a little different than my regular lists of vintage tips as some are superstitious (though there are practical nuggets here too). It’s hard to say how old any of them are, how they came about or why they were considered worthwhile to know.
Old wives tales were a simple way to impress upon someone the importance of doing (or not doing) a particular thing, in a manner which would be remembered and easily passed on from one generation to the next. Sometimes you have to interpret the hidden nuggets (ie. maybe salt stopping evil in its tracks was code for pest control, or the dire warning of accidentally boiling over the milk was more about taking care of precious food stores).
The stories could be regionally important, culturally significant, spiritually necessary (in the minds of those who repeated them), or vital to the health of the household budget (remember there was a time when the prices of salt and other pantry items were quite dear).
I’m not claiming these should be taken seriously or are vital information, I just find them interesting and in some cases useful to know. I pretty much kept the collection light, avoiding the death warnings and the evil eye or witch fears…though if you’re interested in that, stock up on sage and salt STAT, lol…nothing too dramatic in this bunch. I hope you enjoy them and they pique your interest as they do for me .

If a home is in disarray on New Year’s Day, the housewife will struggle with clutter and dissatisfaction throughout the year. If it’s tidy and clean, the home will be easy to manage.
Laundry should never be done on Sundays for there will surely be a terrible stain, tear or worse in the week ahead.
Above ground crops (such as tomatoes) should be sown in the wane of the moon; underground crops (carrots, potatoes, parsnips, etc.) at the change of the moon.
The best day of the year to plant cabbage is on St. Patrick’s day.
The best time to plant flowers is in the increase of the moon.
A mild winter lies ahead if onions dug from the garden at harvest time have thin skins.
Any women who desires to have order in her home must allow sage to flourish in her garden.
Stir cake from you and you will stir your troubles away.
A cake baked in the morning will rise, a cake baked in the afternoon will drop.
To make cake light, it must always be stirred the same way.
Pastry must be rolled an uneven number of times otherwise it will be tough.
Every scrap of pastry must be baked or there will be an unwanted expense.
Cold hands and a warm heart make the best pastry.
A thunderstorm will addle eggs and sour any milk that’s been left out.
Before a young girl bakes her first loaf of bread, her hands should be rubbed in sugar so that she may always make good, sweet bread.
Stir bread away from you for good luck, trouble will come if you stir toward you.
Evergreens should be taken down on Old Christmas Day (January 6th) or ill-luck will follow.
A clean pot should be kept in an empty oven, this will ensure there will always be at least a little food to cook in it.
When making the bed, don’t interrupt your work or you will spend a restless night in it.
Stabbing needles through yarn balls will bring bad luck to anyone who wears something made from that yarn.
Rosemary planted by the doorstep will keep evil away…put salt on the doorstep of a new house and no evil can enter.
If a new bride should quietly take her mother’s dishcloth, she will never be homesick.
Up until the past few generations, people were terrified of evil and more afraid of bad luck than they were of a little dirt (not realizing that pestilence and disease could flourish in an unkempt home), so these little words of wisdom served a purpose…even those that seem ridiculous to us today.
The average person worked HARD back in the day and the last thing anyone wanted to do was worry about which direction the dirt should be swept (according to my collection of tales, it should be swept away from the house rather than towards it or you’re sure to attract doom). Common sense for basic cleanliness? Sure! But the purpose of the tale was to make sure the chore was done with care and attention by a people who commonly lived a hardscrabble life from early morning till late evening…there were no Real Housewives episodes to distract and ease the stress of the day, it was “Go” time from start to finish.
And who knows, maybe these old gals knew a thing or two that we just can’t grasp!

This was published in Tipnut.com in December 2011

September 22nd, 2012

Homemade Ant Killers: Recipes & Tips

The only times ants should be considered a pest is when they are invading your home. Other wise they are a great benefit to you. Find out how at the bottom of this article. This article was put out by Tipnut.com, 2009 and updated 2012.

Homemade Ant Killers: Recipes & Tips

When trying to get rid of ants, it’s helpful to first have a basic understanding how they live and thrive:
They live in colonies and one class within the colony is the worker/gatherer/forager. Workers make up approximately 10% of the colony and it’s their job to go out, find and collect food then bring it back to feed the rest of the colony.
They are mainly looking for two things: food and water. If it’s getting cold outside, they also like to settle in to find shelter. Below I’ve listed various home remedies and solutions for control (along with some tidbits of information on their behavior and habits).
Here’s a list of spray cleaner recipes you can try…
Clean countertops and surfaces well with one of the cleaners below, these can also be used to spray them directly.
Vinegar
Vinegar & Water (50/50 mix)
Cider Vinegar & Water (50/50 mix)
One of these essential oils: Peppermint, Lavender, Eucalyptus, Tea Tree Oil, Witch Hazel Extract (1 tablespoon) plus water–per spray bottle
Liquid Dish Detergent & Water (about 1 tablespoon detergent, fill spray bottle with water).
Did You Know: Ants leave a scented trail for each other so they can easily find their way back to the jackpot (the food source in your house). Trails can be both visible and invisible to human eyes, but they can follow the trails with ease. Washing away these trails will confuse them and make it more difficult to find their favorite places. Making your own cleaners with the above ingredients also adds a repellent that they will avoid.
Baiting

When you provide a tempting treat that is actually poison (known as bait), you want to make sure it’s not too strong that it will kill the ant before it gets back to the colony (sometimes they are gone for days), and that it’s not too weak that it’s ineffective. You want poisoned food brought back to the nest for the rest of the colony to ingest.
The type of food they look for is either sugar or protein, it depends on what the needs of the colony are at the time. This is why a “tried and true” recipe that came highly recommended doesn’t work for you, the bait holds no interest for the particular critters in your home.
Tip: First determine if the ants in your house are after sugar or protein. Leave a sample of each bait out and see which ones they go for. Once you’ve determined what they’re hungry for, set out a few baits with their choice.
Here are a few homemade bait recipes you can try…
Sugar
2 TBS Boric Acid (Borax)
Jam (or Jelly, Honey, Maple Syrup)
Mix the boric acid with the jam or jelly to make a paste. Slather it on a piece of paper, a plate or in a covered container with holes. You may have to adjust amount of Boric Acid if they seem to eat up the bait like crazy, but are getting fatter from it instead of dying.
Sugar
2 cups Sugar
1 cup Water
2 TBS Boric Acid (Borax)
Mix and place in small saucers around the house.
Protein
2 TBS Boric Acid (Borax)
Peanut Butter or Bacon Grease
Mix and set out in mounds on pieces of paper or plates.
Sugar
1 cup Confectioners Sugar
2 TBS Boric Acid (Borax)
Leave this in little mounds or in covered containers with holes.
Sugar Bait
2 TBS Molasses
1 TBS Yeast
1 TBS Sugar
Mix and place mounds on paper, plates or in covered containers with holes.
Important: When baiting so they’ll bring poison back to the nest, resist the temptation to kill them when you see them. You want them to live and take big juicy pieces of poisoned bait back to the nest for the rest of the colony to feast on.
A few baiting tips:
Boric Acid can be harmful if swallowed. If you have kids or pets in the home, set the bait in covered plastic containers with a few holes poked in the sides. You could also use glass jars sealed with lids–just poke holes in the top lid. For strong attraction, smear a bit of non-poisoned bait on top of the lid so they’ll find it easily.
For best results lay out a fresh batch daily.
Lay the bait in areas where you see regular activity and near their points of entry if you know them.
Don’t be diligent washing away their trails, you want them to find the bait spots easily again and again. All the workers in the colony can follow each others trails, so even if you killed off the first foragers, their partners will follow the trail they left.
You may find that a sugar bait will be popular for a few days, then a protein one is needed as they switch to protein foods. Change your method as needed.
If you’ve set out both types (sugar and protein) yet they are attracted to neither, reduce the amount of boric acid used until they starting feasting on the bait.
Did You Know: If a colony senses something is up when its members start dying and begins to feel stressed, the Queen Ant will likely give orders for the colony to split up into a few smaller colonies, trying to preserve as many members as she can. This is why it may take several days of laying out fresh bait regularly–you’re trying to get enough poison into all the colonies to wipe out the whole lot.
Destroying Their Nests

Find the nest and pour one of the following solutions into it. Cover your legs and wear rubber boots if possible, they will be streaming out of the nest while you’re doing this.
Nest Destroying Methods:
1/4 cup liquid dish detergent per gallon of boiling water (add soap after water has been removed from heat). This will likely kill surrounding grass and plants. (Good remedy for fire ants).
Pour large amounts of cider vinegar down inside the ant hill. Do this around the surrounding area as well, for at least three days. Will likely kill plants and grass too.
Bring water to a boil, mix in salt to make a strong salt solution and pour down nest. Repeat over three days (and pour over surrounding area as well to prevent them from rebuilding in the area).
Disturb their dwelling regularly: Flood with lots of water (just use the garden hose and let the water run for awhile). Do this daily for at least a week or two. They will eventually get fed up and move.
A few tips:
Ants can live submerged in water for several days so you need to using boiling hot water to kill them. Pouring boiling hot water into the nest is effective on its own but you could also try adding an ingredient (as shown above) to make the remedy more powerful.
Pour slowly into nest so the water has time to get into all the tunnels and surrounding soil. Do three times the first day, then at least once a day for the next three days.
The best time to do this is when the ants are moving up closer to the earth’s surface (when it’s not too hot or cool). Typically between 10 a.m. and noon on a sunny day is the best time.
You could also try liberally covering the mound with one of the repellents listed below (cinnamon, salt, etc.).
Not Advised:
Pouring kerosene or gasoline on the nest used to be a common method for killing a colony, but it’s not only dangerous it’s also harmful for the surrounding soil.
Did You Know: They not only build their colonies outside, they can also setup house inside. If you notice small hills inside your home, vacuum them up (and dispose vacuum contents in sealed plastic bags immediately). If a large nest has been built, this is a good time to bring in an exterminator.
If it’s winter (below freezing) and your home has ants, you likely have a nest inside the house.
Controlling Them Inside The House

The first line of defense is making your place unattractive to them. Make sure to wipe up spills immediately and wipe off counters, tables and stovetops regularly leaving no crumbs behind. Sweep and wash floors regularly. Don’t leave dirty dishes around the house or in the sink. Keep dry foods (like flour, cereal, sugar, oats, etc.) in air tight containers. Take out garbage regularly and wash out all food packaging and pop bottles before putting in the recycle bin.
Although a sloppy environment will attract them, having them in your home doesn’t necessarily mean you’re a poor housekeeper–they could be after water. If it’s dry outside and there’s not a nearby water source, they will be inside on the hunt for water. They’ll find it in houseplants, sinks and drains, pet water dishes and cups left out containing liquids.
List Of Natural Repellents
Look for cracks or holes in the house where they are coming from, spread any of these repellents around the holes (or combination of items on the list). Also spread around window sills, along baseboards, in corners and outside doors. The theory is that since they are repelled by these items, they’ll turn back. Success of the repellents can depend on the species of ants in your home.
Cinnamon
Ground Black Pepper
Bay Leaves
Whole Cloves
Red Chili Powder (sprinkle liberally or make a paste with water and apply at entrance)
Red Pepper Flakes
Salt
Used Coffee Grounds
Sage
Cucumber Peels
Essential Oils: Peppermint, Lavender, Eucalyptus. Swab these around entrance points.
Tip: Plugging holes and cracks with caulking or filling with vaseline will physically block them from entering.
Food Barriers
The ants could be attracted to your pet’s food dish, a potted plant or dish of candies. Either keep food sealed until needed or surround it with a water barrier so they can’t get to the food. Fill a baking pan with water and set the pet food dish (or potted plant, etc.), in the middle. Mixing in a little liquid dish detergent with the water will be a strong repellent as well as prevent the water from becoming a water source for them.
If it’s a potted plant that’s infested, repot the plant in a fresh pot of soil, washing roots clean of previous soil. You can try submerging the pot in a bucket of water for about 15 minutes to make them flee, but this won’t remove larvae that may be present.
Natural Outdoor Deterrents

Look for entry ways into the dwelling via tree branches touching the house (including the roof), drain pipes, outdoor plants, shrubs, etc., trim these back if possible. Otherwise, wrap branches and pipes with a sticky substance that will trap them before they can find their way in (duct tape facing sticky side out should do it).
If your house exterior will tolerate it without staining (test a small area first), spray a mixture of liquid dish detergent and water around the foundation. There will be a soap residue left on the surface as the water evaporates, hopefully enough to deter them from crossing it. Straight vinegar sprayed on the ground around the house can help too (both methods may harm grass and plants).
Mint: Plant fresh mint around the foundation of the house (can also have potted inside), or sprinkle crushed mint around entrances.
Tansy, Lavender & Sage: Plant as mint above.
Mix cloves and ground pepper with flour (3 TBS spice to 1 cup flour) and spread around areas that have heavy activity, this will help scatter them. Do this when there’s no sign of rain.
Diatomaceous Earth: (can also use inside) Nice, non-toxic pesticide that is pet & child friendly. Probably the most effective naturally occurring protective powder, this is a great option if their nest is underneath a deck or patio and sidewalk blocks. Sprinkle this in the cracks that they will have to crawl up through. Diatomaceous Earth is easily picked up by the hairy bodies of most insects, whereupon it scratches through their protective wax layers and they also absorb some of this material. The result being that the insects lose water rapidly, dry up and die. Further protection is provided by the powder’s property of repelling many insects. In houses it can be used effectively to prevent the entry of certain insects such as earwigs, ants, and cockroaches, and to control these and others that are present in cupboards containing food, carpets, basements, attics, window ledges, pet areas (for fleas), etc. In all of these examples it is important to place a small amount of the powder in corners, cracks, crevices and other areas where insects might hide. Source: Ecological Agriculture Projects, McGill University.
Old Wives Tale: Make a 1″ line of chalk or baby powder (talcum) around the home, ants won’t cross it. Does it work? Many swear that it does.
False Methods

Aspartame: Touted frequently online as originally being developed as an ant poison and an effective way to control carpenter ants. Snopes found this to be false, see: this page for details.
Instant Grits: One popular online remedy recommended is to feed them instant grits, instant oatmeal, cornmeal, cream of wheat or couscous. It’s suggested that they will “explode” when the food would expand inside them as it comes in contact with stomach fluids. A study on the instant grits method and fire ants was done and found to be ineffective, (the report from Texas A&M University is no longer online). Also read the info below, it’s highly unlikely that the adults would even be able to eat the grits as they’re too large.
Did you know: Ants carry solid food particles back to the nest to feed the colony’s larvae, the larvae then processes the food and turns it into a liquid to feed the adults. Adults can ingest very tiny, minuscule particles of food (larger pieces are filtered out), but their diet is from the liquid that the larvae provides.
Keep In Mind They Have A Lot To Offer

Think ants are pests? They may be if they’re taking over your home, but outside they’re very much needed. They aerate the soil, clean up scraps and seeds, control termite populations and they’re a food source for birds and other insects. As with all creatures, they play an important part in a healthy planet.
If you prefer encouraging them to move elsewhere instead of killing them, make your home their last choice for foraging by using the above control methods and tips.

September 20th, 2012

Cholesterol: It’s All Good

I have found that if I refuse to take medication, nothing happens to me. I just do research and try to do healthy things. Like take certain vitimins and eat certain types of food to help control what ever the doctors are telling me I should do. I thought this article was interesting. Enjoy!

by: Margie King, Health Coach
GreenMedInfo.com

You’ve heard it repeatedly: there are two kinds of cholesterol: the good high density lipoprotein (HDL) and the “bad” low density lipoprotein (LDL). Now a researcher at Texas A&M University has come to the defense of LDL and says that it may not be so bad after all. In fact, it helps build muscle.

According to Steve Riechman, a researcher in the Department of Health and Kinesiology, the study reveals that “LDL is not the evil Darth Vader of health it has been made out to be in recent years.”

In a study published in the Journal of Gerontology, Riechman and colleagues from the University of Pittsburgh, Kent State University, the Johns Hopkins Weight Management Center and the Northern Ontario School of Medicine examined 52 adults from ages 60 to 69. The participants were in generally good health, but not physically active, and none of them were participating in a training program.

To the researchers’ surprise, after the subjects completed fairly vigorous workouts, the participants who had the highest levels of LDL cholesterol had gained the most muscle mass.

According to Riechman, the study shows that we need a certain amount of LDL to gain more muscle mass. “There’s no doubt you need both – the LDL and the HDL — and the truth is, it (cholesterol) is all good,” said Reichman.

Cholesterol is a type of fat found in all humans and serves many necessary functions in the body. For instance, it’s been called the mother of all hormones. Any attempt to remove all the ‘bad’ cholesterol from your body would cause serious problems. In fact, low levels of cholesterol can be hazardous to your health.

LDL is almost always referred to as the “bad” cholesterol because it is often found as a buildup in the walls of arteries. It’s been associated with a slowing of blood flow which often leads to heart disease and heart attacks. HDL, usually called the “good cholesterol,” often helps remove cholesterol from the arteries.

However, the idea that there are “bad” and “good” blood lipids that contribute to heart disease is known as the “lipid hypothesis,” or “cholesterol myth.” The hypothesis is subject to much criticism and has been challenged often. The underlying causes of cardiovascular disease are more likely related to inflammation and other factors.

Riechman agrees that the common attitude to cholesterol is wrong. He prefers to focus on the very useful purpose that LDL serves. Without cholesterol, he points out, we would die. In fact, studies in the elderly have shown that those with the lowest levels of cholesterol are at highest risk of death from all causes.

“Everyone needs a certain amount of both LDL and HDL in their bodies,” says Riechman. “We need to change this idea of LDL always being the evil thing – we all need it, and we need it to do its job.”

He points out that LDL delivers needed cholesterol to our tissues for repair, and HDL, the good cholesterol, cleans up after the repair is done. This study shows another benefit of LDL. The more you have in your blood, the better you are able to build muscle during resistance training.

What’s bad about that?

Read the full article and comment here: http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/cholesterol-it%E2%80%99s-all-good

September 17th, 2012

A Good Use For Toilet Paper Rolls

This is a really good idea. I have used tape and rubber bands in the past. This is much better for not messing up the paper.

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